Julie Cohen (UC Santa Barbara • Futurity) | Using fewer brain ‘tools’ may speed learning

With the neurological correlates of the learning process coming into focus, the scientists were able to delve into the differences among participants in order to explain why some learned the sequences faster than others. Counterintuitive as it may seem, the participants who showed decreased neural activity learned the fastest. The critical distinction was in areas not directly related to seeing the cues or playing the notes: the frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. These cognitive control centers are thought to be most responsible for what is known as executive function…“It’s the people who can turn off the communication to these parts of their brain the quickest who have the steepest drop-off in their completion times[.]”


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Julie Cohen (UC Santa Barbara • Futurity) | Using fewer brain ‘tools’ may speed learning

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